Roger Downey

14 POSTS 9 COMMENTS

2010 Entertainment; 2020 Allegory

How to Train Your Dragon doesn't exactly live up to my memory of it. It far surpasses recollection, shrugging itself out of the familiar skin of animated fantasy action-movie and emerging as a noble allegory.

Who Speaks for Us?

In a time when the word “community” occurs at least once in every official communication down to solid-waste disposal notices, who actually speaks to and for the generality? Who tries today to assist us toward self-healing?

Put your TrumpBux to work

Just between us: do you really need your $1,200 share of the federal largess?

CoronaNumbers: Turning in our Favor?

“What we need to control is the panic. In the long term, we’re going to be fine”.

Panhandling Dialed Up To 10: It Can’t Fix The Arts Crisis

"The arts” must cease lobbying just for themselves but for their just share of support alongside other “non-profit” instruments of a just society; essentials like universal public heath, public education, basic income.

How A Tex-afied Retelling Of Wagner’s “Ring” Became An American Theatre Staple

The original, gen-yew-ine original was not at all operatic: that was part of its charm. And it probably couldn't have come into being in any other American city of the time. Informal smash-and-grab performances were a distinctive aspect of the Seattle theater scene from the 1970s onward, starting with the Empty Space theater's summer shows in Volunteer Park and Norman Langill's flatbed truck borne One Reel Vaudeville Show.

Review: “Evgenyi Onegin” – Pain! Passion! Poetry! (hold the irony . . .)

I suddenly realized how lucky we are to have it at all. If the poet who created the story and the composer who set it to music 40 years later had ever actually met, they would probably have disliked each other enough to make collaboration impossible.

Review: Seattle Opera’s Cinderella – Dickens Meets Rossini Meets Tim Burton

Seattle Opera’s current staging of Cenerentola is mostly fun to watch. It is also a great example of how much work having fun can be, on both sides of the imaginary footlights.

Scootergeddon? Ready or Not, Here They Come

The rush to electric scooters as a solution to urban congestion and traffic woes is hitting town in a very Seattle way: cautiously, processed-to-death—and maybe too late.

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Why is Seattle so Good at Iconic Moments of Radicalism?

In 1885-1915, the state's formative period, "Washington attracted a prodigious share of radicals, socialists, and utopians," coming here because we were a state that welcomed radical change.

The Arts Online: Ten Great YouTubes that wouldn’t have been made without Lockdown

Deprived of their usual performance venues, artists have turned to the internet to make and disseminate their art. The art is evolving quickly

Capitol Hill’s Occupied Zone and how it Happened

Overall, observers and participants will need to continue thinking about how claiming a portion of public space for an underserved and discriminated community can initiate effective social and political change, and not perpetuate the status quo or ignite a right-wing backlash that pursues further repressive policies.

Reading: The Plague During Plague

This spring I decided to take a zoomed book class offered by Alliance Française Seattle. The assigned...

Paint The Town: Takiyah Ward and the Autonomous Zone’s Defining Mural

“Normally getting a project of this size done in the city of Seattle would have required months of bureaucracy, red tape, and writing grants, and trying to find the money, all of which can kill a creative vibe or project real quick.”