While everybody here is pretty much on the mark for the way they and people in the liberal bubble saw and reacted to the marvelous calm decency in the presentations of Ambassador William Taylor and Deputy Secretary of State George Kent, my colleagues — and others in my reading of the liberal media — are too hasty in concluding the Democrats made much progress in convincing the public to take their side. In fact, a lot of writers didn’t even see that as the issue, judging the day on who won, like judges on the bench, inside the courtroom.

For one thing, most of we commentators and even major media reporters forget that they already know much, much more about this — in detail — than, really, most everybody else. So my take is that the first day of the public impeachment hearings fell flat. The public was not moved, more likely overwhelmed by competing details, the truth of which, for most, remains uncertain.

On to day two for what’s next.

Want real impact? The House could send a couple of people from the Sergeant-At-Arms’ office in uniform over to Trump’s acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney’s house — and the homes of maybe a few other current and ex-White House employees ignoring lawful subpoenas — about 8 p.m. some night next week and arrest them for contempt of Congress.

Of course, they’ll be bailed out right away and Trump will be able scream and Tweet “coup.” Just what he wants.  But in the long run will that be so bad?

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